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Online Event – Desktop Cinema Working Group: New Digital Ecologies

If sand were stone
As If Sand Were Stone… (35 min, 2019)
Cinema
May
28
4 PM CST

Event Details

Date & Time:

Thu May 28, 2020
4 PM CST

Location:

The Block Museum of Art
40 Arts Circle Drive
Evanston, IL 60208

Audience:

Open to the public

Details:

Block Cinema inaugurates its Desktop Cinema Working Group screening series with an online presentation of filmmaker and scholar Ben Mendelsohn’s AS IF SAND WERE STONE… (35 min, 2019), an essay film examining the making and remaking of urban waterfronts in New York City. Narrated by landscape architect Gena Wirth, the film analyzes dredging and sand filling as key infrastructural processes in the production of urban space. The film combines observational footage of New York’s massive harbor deepening project with a series of self-reflexive research spirals about human earth moving in the region. Mendelsohn’s documentary will screen alongside two episodes of WHAT IS DEEP SEA MINING? (12 min, 2018-2019), a series of innovative web documentaries by the Portuguese media collective Inhabitants

Following the screening, Mendelsohn will appear in conversation with Jacob Leveton, PhD candidate in Art History at Northwestern University.

Various Artists, USA and Portugal, Digital, approx. 60 min

Co-sponsored by the Environmental Humanities Working Group, the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities, and the Program in Critical Theory at Northwestern.

LIVESTREAM LINK WILL BE SENT TO TICKET HOLDERS 48 HOURS PRIOR TO SCREENING

RSVP

 


ABOUT THE DESKTOP CINEMA WORKING GROUP:

The Desktop Cinema Working Group is a nascent collective of scholar-filmmaker-curators committed to the significance of computer screen capture in moving-image practices. As more of our lives become hypermediated by the computer desktop, what insights can we glean from the wide range of contemporary works that deploy (or destroy) the space of the computer screen? What predictions, explanations, or possibilities can we find in the prehistory of this genre, in the longstanding interactions between graphical user interfaces and "cinema"? How do working artists exploit the genre’s possibilities to interrogate critical social, political, and environmental issues beyond the computer screen?

Contact The Block Museum of Art for more information: (847) 491-4000 or email us at block-museum@northwestern.edu